Reprogram your brain for happiness in 3 simple steps

little moments for happiness

Happiness is something you can build. Little by little, each time someone says something mean to us or ignore us, it creates a “hole in our hearts” and makes us less confident and less happy in the long-term. But a simple way exists to change your brain into a positive mood.

Neuropsychologist Rick Hanson says as simple as it may sound, brain science backs the well-known popular wisdom, “positive brings positive.”

Positive brings positive

During a talk, “Taking in the Good” for Chicago Ideas Week in 2013, he explained how to create positive connections in our brains.

He said that as a child he was repetitively bullied by other children. He did not face any major life trauma but still, years later, he realized during his studies that those negative moments had changed him and made him feel empty inside. Hanson said he felt like he had “…a hole in my heart.”

One of our basic needs is to feel valued, included, recognized and appreciated. Hanson said he began to notice a reaction that seemed amazing at first.

“If someone was nice to me, or wanted me on their team, or hired me, or if a good thing happened, and if I stayed with the experience by focusing on the good, I started gradually feeling better,” he said.

The longer you stay with a happy feeling or memory, the stronger the connection will become in your brain and gradually, you will reprogram your brain to be happier.

3 steps to happiness

To “reprogram” your brain to happiness is very simple. Follow these 3 good practices:

  1. Appreciate little pleasures of life even when it is hard: a nice flower, a good moment with a friend, the taste of coffee. Finding the good in small things, day by day, is not naïve but a way to change your brain.
  2. Don’t rush. When you live a happy experience, take the time to really feel it in your body for at least 10 seconds. This way, a good small fact will become a great memory.
  3. Make a conscious effort to remember happy experiences. (We suggest to write them down in a notebook). If you practice those methods day by day, you will be able to close your eyes and think of a good memory or loving experience very easily!

To finish, if you choose to concentrate on the good each day, you will fill yourself with calm, joy and confidence. It is good for you but also good for the people you know and love.

More about Rick Hanson: he is the author of Hardwiring Happiness, Buddha’s Brain and Just One Thin – books that have been translated into more than a dozen languages. He is also a senior fellow of the Greater Good Science Center at the University of California Berkeley and founder of the Wellspring Institute for Neuroscience and Contemplative Wisdom in San Rafael, California.

The 5 most common regrets of people dying

regrets of the dying

Do you know the most common 5 regrets of people dying? Read about them and decide what your next steps should be to create a life free of regret.

Bronnie Ware was a nurse working in palliative care and she soon noticed that people who were going to die had all the same 5 common regrets.

1. I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me. This is the most common regret of all. It’s important to try to fulfil at least some of our dreams and especially when we still have good health. Many people take health for granted.

2. I wish I hadn’t worked so hard. People regret to have spent so much time working and not being with their loved ones. It’s especially true in the situation of migrant workers apart from their families. You need to discuss your situation with your family and come up with a plan so, you can go home quickly.

3. I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings. Many people don’t express their feelings because they are afraid to hurt others or to be rejected. But it makes them sick and accept things they should not accept. If people love you, they will appreciate your honesty. If they don’t, they will be out of your life and this is better to get away from these unhealthy relationships.

4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends. Many people are so busy that they don’t devote time to their friends or to make new friends. They find themselves lonely at the end.

5. I wish that I had let myself be happier. Many people don’t realize until the end that happiness is also a choice. Smile, laugh and appreciate the little joys of life.

“Life is a choice. It is YOUR life. Choose consciously, choose wisely, choose honestly. Choose happiness.” Bronnie Ware

Read more about it here: http://www.bronnieware.com/blog/regrets-of-the-dying